Legenda is their second studio album that was released in 1991. Official reissue on limted 180 gr black vinyl with printed inner sleeve.
“Legenda” is an ambitious musical project, a multilayered masterpiece that is meaningful on many levels and escapes easy categorization. The production is fantastic: the sound is dark and monumental but unpretentious, powerful but relying on the strength of the composition rather than on petty heaviness, it is also cold and yet organic and epic. In addition to the classic punk instruments, there are some flute, French horn, acoustic guitar, clarinet, trumpet and synth on “Legenda”.
The horns increase the epic, monumental quality of the album, possibly even casting an almost ironic, self-reflexive light upon it, and add a subtle moodiness when needed. The synth is very much an atmospheric tool and offers a postindustrial reading of the Soviet epics. For what it is worth, and as irrelevant as it might be, “Legenda” blends the distinctively Polish punk sound of Dezerter (noticeably in the riffs’ structure) with the awe-inspiring power of “In darkness”-era Antisect in order to get the perfect ink with which Armia are going to write a darkly ironic, multi-instrumental story about madness and alienation.
“Legenda” is incredibly difficult to describe but listening to it as a story is probably the most relevant stance. There are interludes that give fluidity to the album and confer meaning to what precedes or follows. The Don Quijote metaphor that pervades the aesthetics of the Lp tends to indicate that “Legenda” could be a contextualized rewriting. A blinded man living in denial, obsessed with ideas but discarding reality, as pathetic as he is heroic, the Quijote prism can be meaningful on many levels. It could be a comment on post-Soviet Poland (debunking the mythical representation), or on punk-rock, or on the shibboleth of ideology, or on the creative act itself. (Terminal Sound Nuisance)
(Metal Mind Production)