Spitboy blazed trails for feminist musicians in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond during their brief but impactful life, touring the United States, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. Releasing records on labels such as Ebullition, Allied Recordings, and Bay Area punk institution Lookout Records, they stood solitarily against what, at the time, was an almost entirely male-dominated sub culture of punk and hardcore. Formed in response to the homogenized masculinity of the late 1980’s and early 1990s scene, their brash and abrasive style of music was paired equally with their confrontational live shows, and unwillingness to tolerate preconceived gender roles and social norms within the punk scene, and American society at large.

100% of the proceeds from the release will go to the National Women’s Law Center.

-Complete Discography
-Fully Remastered
-Liner notes by Billie Joe Armstrong and Vique Simba

“They were one of those bands that were a prequel to what the future was becoming. Feminism, human rights, animal rights, environmental protection, gender issues… Spitboy was singing about these issues 30 fucking years ago. I’m so grateful to have witnessed it.” -Billie Joe Armstrong “Spitboy are one of the most important punk bands to have ever existed. To me, an angry 20-year-old in London, discovering them felt like the first time I truly identified with a band’s politics and agenda. One of my all-time favourite albums (then and now) was Penis Envy by Crass. No lyrics had ever touched me the way this album had–until Spitboy entered my life. My people. My radical feminists. My punk scene. Where I have lived and belonged for over 30 years.” -Vique Simba

“They were one of those bands that were a prequel to what the future was becoming. Feminism, human rights, animal rights, environmental protection, gender issues… Spitboy was singing about these issues 30 fucking years ago. I’m so grateful to have witnessed it.”
– Billie Joe Armstrong, Green Day

“A lot of people don’t want to go to a punk show and get a lecture, but we didn’t care. We want to be a band for women in the scene and while we’re at it, we’d like to tell the young men a thing or two and maybe prevent harassment, prevent rape, or get people thinking about these issues. We knew that we were alienating some people, but the music was loud and fast and angry, so it was as combative, and we just thought, we’re never going to break into a major label. That wasn’t our aim, so we didn’t really spend a lot of time worrying about that.”
-Drummer / lyricist Michelle Cruz Gonzales to LA Review of Books, 2018

(Don Giovanni Records)